Reports

Reports and documents by IAE staff.  

Champoeg Prairie Restoration Annual Report

Andy Neill   2019

The Institute for Applied Ecology (IAE) has been involved in restoration of Champoeg Prairie, a 45-acre former agricultural field at Champoeg State Heritage Area, since 2013. In 2014, IAE developed and began implementation of the Champoeg Prairie Restoration Plan (IAE 2014) for Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The goal of restoration at Champoeg Prairie is to create upland and wet prairie habitats with diverse plant communities that attract pollinators, birds and other wildlife. Restoration objectives include controlling high priority invasive species, improving forb diversity, increasing abundance of culturally significant species, and implementing periodic prescribed burns. This report summarizes prairie conditions and restoration actions in 2019. Weed management included mowing, hand weeding, and broadcast and spot spray herbicide applications. Some of the treated or disturbed areas of the prairie were planted with native trees, shrub, and forbs. In particular, a 2.8-acre area in the central part of the prairie that has been difficult to establish natives from seed was planted with shrubs and trees in winter 2019. Native prairie species, including culturally important food plants, were planted in a portion of Champoeg Prairie for a second consecutive year. It is hoped that this portion of Champoeg Prairie will be a place for tribal members to harvest traditional food and fiber plants in the future. The planting was completed through the combined efforts of IAE, OPRD, and Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde (CTGR) Natural Resources Department employees, students and teachers from Newberg High School, and other dedicated volunteers.

Enhancement of Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly habitat at Beazell Memorial Forest: 2018 annual report

Andy Neill   2018

Institute for Applied Ecology (IAE) partnered with Benton County Natural Areas and Parks Department (Benton County) in 2018 to continue implementation of habitat restoration activities at Beazell Memorial Forest. Restoration efforts in three meadows at Beazell support the recovery of the federally listed Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha taylori). Restoration efforts focused on expansion and enhancement of Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly habitat by identifying and treating invasive species, clearing trees, limbs and slash, and creating Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly habitat patches planted and seeded with a high density of Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly nectar and larval host food plants.

Fender’s Blue Butterfly Habitat Restoration at Henry Hagg Lake

Neill, Andy and Andrew Esterson   2019

In 2019, the Institute for Applied Ecology (IAE) partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) to help restore habitat at Henry Hagg Lake (Hagg Lake) to aid in the recovery of the endangered Fender’s blue butterfly (Icaricia icarioides fenderi) and its host plant, the threatened Kincaid’s lupine (Lupinus oreganus). Through this partnership, IAE provides recommendations for habitat management, executes on-the-ground management actions, manages subcontractors, produces and procures native plant materials, and develops and purchases native seed mixes. Special Note: This report has been modified from its original format by removing maps and/or appendices that include information on the location of rare and sensitive species.

Champoeg Prairie Restoration Annual Report

Andy Neill   2018

The Institute for Applied Ecology (IAE) has been involved in restoration of Champoeg Prairie, a 45-acre former agricultural field at Champoeg State Heritage Area, since 2013. In 2014, IAE developed and began implementation of the Champoeg Prairie Restoration Plan (IAE 2014) for Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The goal of restoration efforts at Champoeg Prairie is to create upland and wet prairie habitats with diverse plant communities. This report summarizes prairie conditions and management actions in 2018. The objectives of restoration of Champoeg Prairie include controlling high priority invasive species, improving forb diversity increasing abundance of culturally significant species, and implementing periodic prescribed burns as part of prairie management. In 2018, weed management included mowing, hand weeding, and broadcast and spot spray herbicide applications. Some of the treated or disturbed areas of the prairie were seeded with native forbs, grasses, sedges and rushes. Native prairie species, including culturally important food and fiber plants, were planted in a portion of Champoeg Prairie. It is hoped that this portion of Champoeg Prairie will be a place for local tribal members to harvest traditional food and fiber plants and share knowledge of these plants, harvesting techniques, and the cultural significance of the Champoeg area. The creation of this harvest area was celebrated by a cultural event hosted by IAE, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), and the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde (CTGR) where attendees planted culturally important food plants, ate traditionally prepared foods, and learned about tool and basket making techniques.

Comparing historical losses of forested, scrub-shrub, and emergent tidal wetlands on the Oregon coast, USA: A paradigm shift for estuary restoration and conservation

Laura S. Brophy   2019

   

Modeling sea level rise impacts to Oregon’s tidal wetlands: Maps and prioritization tools to help plan for habitat conservation into the future

Laura S. Brophy and Michael J. Ewald   2017

   

Insights into estuary habitat loss in the western United States using a new method for mapping maximum extent of tidal wetlands

Brophy, L.S., C.M. Greene, V.C. Hare, B. Holycross, A. Lanier, W.N. Heady, K. O'Connor, H. Imaki, T. Haddad, and R. Dana   2019

   

Southern Flow Corridor effectiveness monitoring, 2015-2017: Blue carbon and sediment accretion

Laura S. Brophy, Erin K. Peck, Scott J. Bailey, Craig E. Cornu, Robert A. Wheatcroft, Laura A. Brown, Michael J. Ewald   2018

   

Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly habitat restoration at Cardwell Hill: Final Report 2019

Andy Neill   2019

The Institute for Applied Ecology worked with private landowners and USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program to enhance the three Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly occupied meadows at Cardwell Hill during 2018 and 2019. Work was funded by a grant with Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board funds administered through the Oregon State Weed Board. This grant supported herbicide treatments to control priority weeds and encroaching shrubs and the purchase and planting of plant materials to enhance and improve butterfly habitat throughout the Cardwell Hill project site.

Restoration of Willamette Valley Upland Prairies at Fern Ridge Reservoir

Gray, Erin C. and Matt A. Bahm   2018

Executive Summary This document summarizes long-term monitoring and provides management recommendations for prairie restoration efforts at Fern Ridge Reservoir on lands managed by the US Army Corps of Engineers.  Quantitative and/or qualitative monitoring has occurred annually since 2008, dependent upon whether treatment actions have occurred.  In 2018, we quantitatively monitored 9 sites: Big Spires, West […]