Travel Ticker supports IAE!

We are grateful for a significant donation from Travel Ticker!  Travel-Ticker.com offers travel deals and hotel reservations at bargain rates. They prioritize safety, speed and reliability without hidden charges that are added on later in the booking process.

Helping Flyer with Fire: Burn helps butterfly habitat

On Friday, October 16, 2015, crews from Philomath Fire & Rescue and Department of Forestry conducted a prescribed burn as a training exercise at Lupine Meadows, a Greenbelt Land Trust property near Philomath. IAE is working with Greenbelt to improve habitat for the endangered Fender’s blue butterfly, which exists in small numbers at Lupine Meadows. […]

A trip down to the southern Oregon coast!

In August 2015 the IAE Conservation Research crew traveled down to new territory: Coos Bay on the southern Oregon coast! We were investigating the status of both Point Reyes bird’s beak (Cordylanthus maritimus spp. palustris) and Western marsh-rosemary (Limonium californicum). Point Reyes bird’s beak is listed as a federal Species of Concern and Western marsh-rosemary is listed as […]

Every cloud has a “Silver” lining

Gloomy skies and rain returned to Oregon this fall, but every cloud has a silver lining. For the last three years, IAE has sponsored teams from the AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC), a federal program that sends 18-24 year-olds to serve across the nation. This fall IAE hosted the “Silver 5” team and this […]

Fun Times at the 2015 Invasive Species Cook-off

The 2015 Invasive Species Cook-off, IAE’s annual party and fundraiser, was held at the Benton County Fairgrounds on Saturday, August 22nd. The many cooks started preparations started weeks in advance of the event. Hunters and gatherers headed out at dawn and dusk to collect invasive bullfrogs and crayfish, thistles and dandelions, before coming up with […]

Adaptive Restoration in Oregon’s Coastal Prairies, Clatsop Plains

Adaptive management is a framework for making decisions based on the assessed impacts of treatments, the results of which are formed into a flexible management plan with modifications as the plan progresses. Adaptive habitat restoration requires novel approaches and all-encompassing solutions to improve the integrity of ecosystems and their surrounding environments. Coastal prairie ecosystems are […]

A Successful Watershed Workshop for Teachers

With the help of a kick net, teachers Gerhard Behrens and Susan Reeves sampled Wells Creek for aquatic invertebrates as part of a 4 day “Watershed Teacher Workshop,” put on by Institute for Applied Ecology (IAE) and Marys River Watershed Council with funding from Gray Family Foundation. “I felt like a student and an honored […]

Seeding the Prairies – Part 2

The Institute for Applied Ecology (IAE) is collaborating with Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) to restore their 20 acre Witham-Gellatly property near Philomath. Restoration at the upland prairie will mitigate for incidental impacts to Kincaid’s lupine (Lupinus oreganus) and Fender’s blue butterfly (Icaricia icarioides fenderi) during routine road maintenance activities, as outlined in ODOT’s Statewide […]

Conservation Research Adventures to the Desert

In June we said goodbye to our Corvallis western Oregon home and set out for a long day of traveling to Vale, Oregon on the eastern part of the state to monitor Astragalus mulfordiae, or Mulford’s milkvetch. Although the journey was long, it was a beautiful sight to watch the greens of the Cascades turn […]

The Great Fork Migration of 2015

For sometime now, the fork population at the Institute for Applied Ecology has enjoyed a relatively stable and consistent biannual migration, where these lovely eating utensils disappear for some months usually correlating with the start of the field season, and return with the end of the field season. This season however has been markedly different […]

Reed_Micro818

Adaptive Restoration Efforts in Willapa Bay!

In June we traveled to the north coast by Astoria, OR and Long Beach, WA to assess the health and restoration potential at several different coastal prairie sites. Three of the five sites were located on land managed by the North Coast Land Conservancy, a non-profit that tackles conservation projects from the Columbia River south to Lincoln City. The other two sites are located on land owned by the National Park Service and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. The ultimate goal of this project is to evaluate the effects of adaptive restoration techniques on coastal prairie. The results of this project will provide useful information for future restoration efforts of coastal prairie, which is native habitat for the Oregon silverspot butterfly. In order to research the best adaptive management methods for prairie restoration, three techniques and a control were established: herbicide, soil inversion, and soil removal. The success of each restoration method is evaluated by collecting plant community data in all research plots every year. Within each plot we estimated percent cover of all plants occurring in four square meters. The plot photos are pictured below:

Reed_Micro818

Control: These plots are established without any treatments but are exposed to the same conditions (weather, climate, herbivory, etc.) to create a basis for comparison with other treatments. Photo credit: Emma MacDonald

SurfPines_Micro426

Topsoil removal: The entire nutrient rich top layer (essentially all organic material) was excavated from these plots leaving a sandy nutrient poor layer for new plants to colonize. Photo credit: Connor Whitaker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neacoxie_Micro460

Topsoil Inversion: Vegetation and soil in these plots were turned over so they mimicked dune-soil conditions where nutrient rich soil layers (topsoil) move under or over nutrient poor (sandy) layers over time. Photo credit: Connor Whitaker

SurfPines_Micro428

Herbicide application: Glyphosate was applied to these plots to assess the effect herbicide has on native plant community composition by exterminating exotic species. Photo credit: Connor Whitaker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SurfPines_5

View of Surf Pines study site: From a distance, the experimental design and all the treatments are shown. Photo credit: Emma MacDonald

Look for more information on these study sites and coastal prairie restoration efforts in a future edition of the Native Plant Society of Oregon's Bulletin!

Microclimates and Mustard

For much of June, Connor Whitaker, from the CR intern group, has been working closely on projects with Erin Gray and Matt Bahm. Erin and Connor spent a week monitoring an experiment that investigates the effects of microclimate on Kincaid’s lupine (Lupinus oreganus); following this, Matt and Connor spent two weeks near the John Day National Monument, […]